March 2018

The history mural has begun! I am designing and painting a new history mural for my home town of Hallowell, Maine.  This is going to be 38 x 30 feet on an exterior wall at the north entrance to town.  Chris Vallee has donated the north wall of his real estate building on 89 Water St. The mural will tell the history of Hallowell, from the founding in the mid 1700's onward.  Our town built ships, cut timber, carved granite from our hills for great buildings and monuments of the young nation and had a thriving mill industry, making everything from sandpaper

Feet, feet and more feet.  Drawing this lower extremity is fun.  Feet can be very expressive.  We are used to hand gestures in paintings but feet can be story tellers too. I am working on a new dance painting where both, feet and hands, are very important.  When you are eager to start a new painting it is so tempting to just jump in as the idea rushes you—like a vacation romance. While this can yield some clever brushwork—well, and some true disasters as well—more often it is better to rehearse the parts, to dig in and find better and better ways

Street Art Show, 7.5 x 13 inches, pencil on watercolor paper This morning I was digging through my flat files to find an older watercolor I did (Autumn Cemetery)---couldn't remember if I had sold it or still had it tucked away somewhere.  Anyway, while digging I stumbled over this drawing I had done at a street art show years ago.  

Some evenings it is good just to sit and sketch or doodle.  I like to just noodle around with a pencil and without trying to plan a new painting.  If we get too locked tight, always producing, producing, producing, it is easy to forget to relax and just play. Drawing is just plain fun so drawing without a plan is a good way to relax.   It loosens the hand and mind.  Sometimes I find things I want to pursue further, but mostly this is just a way to relax.

While I am not a strict anatomist—I am perfectly happy to distort the human form if it fits my painting idea—I do, however, love the study of the human form.  Changing the human form to fit my paintings is important.  Nevertheless, it is very useful to go back and draw some muscles and bones.  I like the review; I like the peaceful study of the body; and it is helpful in my paintings, even those paintings where I freely twist and shape. I study on my own.  There weren't really anatomy classes in either of the art colleges I attended, back